About us

Who we are

The group have been colour-ringing waterbirds since 2008, operating across Britain and Ireland using a variety of catch methods, with the main aim of providing a better understanding of our resident and migratory waterbirds. For more information about our scientific aims and the species we study, see the individual species pages.

The group have a keen personal interest in waterbirds and their conservation. Members include bird ringers, fieldworkers, researchers and statisticians who together, bring their own expertise to the different work areas, in order to ensure our activities and data are used most effectively. All members contribute to the individual species studies in their own time.

What we do

Colour-marking is a tool used to help learn more about bird populations, by adding lightweight colour-rings or neck-collars, allows the identity of an individual bird to be established remotely, without the need for recapture. Colour-marking can facilitate more detailed studies on waterbird movements than are possible when using metal rings alone, as far more data can be collected. This method of ringing is also widely used in many survival studies, resulting in survival trends being published and used in population models to assess causes of population declines.

Results

Brides, K, K.A. Wood, S.W. Petrek, J. Cooper, S.E. Christmas, J. Middleton, K. Leighton & A. Grogan. 2021. Moult migration, site fidelity and survival of British Greylag Geese Anser anser at Windermere, Cumbria. Ringing & Migration 34: 84-94. View

Brides, K, J. Middleton, K. Leighton & A. Grogan. 2018. The use of camera traps to identify individual colour-marked geese at a moulting site. Ringing & Migration 3319-22. View

Collaboration

We are open to offers of collaboration with other groups, researchers and students. Please get in touch with Kane Brides (kanebrides AT gmail.com) if you wish you discuss the possible use of our data or the initiation of a new study.

With thanks

Our thanks and appreciation goes to all observers who send in sightings of colour-marked birds. Your tremendous effort and support has ensured the continuing success of these colour-marking projects.

Thanks also go to Roger Byng, Damien Giblin, James Lees and Kevin Livesey for their permission to use photos for this website.

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